Friday, October 24, 2008

Look what Alex has found ....



The House of Books has No Windows. (Although Alex thinks it looks more like a shed, of course).

Has anyone seen it? I'm wondering if the no windows bit is a good thing, or a bad. Are they saying that too many books make us look inward, rather than out of the windows? I'm thinking of the exercise in The Artists Way where you have to give up reading for a week. Yep, that's it. The one that makes most writers hyperventilate.

7 comments:

Debi said...

No reading for a week? *gasp*

Presumably that just means books, but what's the intention behind it?

Sorry - I need a lie down ... *wheeze*

jem said...

Perhaps it suggests that in a house of books you don't need any windows because each book is a window with a view of the authors imagination.

Alex said...

Folks, it's a shed, not a house. A shed.

Sarah Salway said...

I know, Debi! And no, it's everything, not even a cereal packet. But when you get used to it, it's strangely liberating. Try it - maybe for 10 minutes to begin with!
Yep, Jem. That's a nice metaphor, and Alex dear, of course it's a shed. It's a lovely shed (snigger)

Fiona Robyn said...

Have never been brave enough to do that Cameron excercise, but can see how it might be helpful - clearing all those words out for a week...

I looked like I was sat inside my own version of this bookshed for most of today... have lots of books for sale now for £3 each if anyone wants any! (http:/www.plantingwords.com)

Debi said...

Can't bear to. I have a friend who came to this country as an adult whose first priority in childhood was survival, with education not getting a look in.

Imagine finding yourself in London and trying to get around if you can't read. At all. Ever.

The thought of even spending ten mins doing this by choice is anathema to me. *shudder*

Sarah Salway said...

Yes, you're right, Debi. Your friend's experience shows the luxury and privilege of reading. For us to give it up in these circumstances seems perverse. But I think Julia Cameron's point is that we can use reading as a shield for not looking. If we have a book in our hands we can escape our current situation - whether that's a train journey or a meal on our own - and she's just trying to make us - as writers - acknowledge this.