Wednesday, February 04, 2009

The meaning of words



Susanne has more words for ‘breakup’ than the average Eskimo has for snow. But none say what she means. He left me. We don’t see each other. He doesn’t know what’s good for him. No, what she means is white, silent, icy, and changes everything. We are snow. Better.

4 comments:

Douglas Bruton said...

What Ekaterina liked about snow was the way it wiped everything clean. And the way there were no paths anymore. Just white space. And like the freedom of a new page in her book, she could make a mark anywhere. Or standing still, wonder at the beauty of no marks.

Kathryn's Daily Writing Workout said...

The overhanging branches laden with the night's snowfall threaten that they may eventually tip right down, poke their fingers through the dense, frozen blanket and disturb the slimy leaves beneath. In the meantime, only her clenched jaw holds the scene in place; she'll be spitting crumbled teeth any time soon.

Research Papers said...

Words are not limited to this definition - a group of letters that form a meaning. Words are way beyond letters. These have meanings and it depend on the user. A book report will be nothing without the proper use of words. Words are indeed powerful.

Sarah Salway said...

Nice, Douglas and Kathryn, although i think research papers might have an ulterior motive.